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Try The Super-Secure USB Drive OS That Edward Snowden Insists On Using

We all know that Edward Snowden insists on secure email, but he’s also very picky about his operating systems too. In fact, he uses a free, super-secure version of Linux — called Tails — that fits on a USB stick and can be used on any computer without leaving a trace.


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How To Fix 3 Of The Most Common System Problems Without Restoring A Backup

Corrupt system files, account lockouts and accidentally deleted data are three scary computer problems that often send people running for their backup drives. While restoring a backup may technically fix things, a full system backup is usually a very time-consuming overkill in these cases, and nobody likes the time-warp effect of restoring one (e.g. if your last full backup ran a week ago). When these problems occur, fixing them can be far simpler than you might think.


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iTunes 10.3 Now Available With Added Cloud Features

Windows/Mac OS X: iTunes 10.3 beta is officially available, bringing with it a portion of the new iCloud features known as “iTunes in the Cloud”, but only the features that matter if you buy content from iTunes.


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Test Your Browser's IPv6 Readiness With A Simple Web Page

In preparation for World IPv6 Day, Google’s set up a simple test page to allow users to check whether or not their current browsers, systems and networks are set up to handle the impending changeover.


Google Search Now Recognises When You're Looking For Images

Default results for Google Search have been updated to show users more images up front when it appears that they’re actually looking for images. If a user types “pictures of monkeys”, “monkey photos”, “monkey imagery” or something similar, a grid-layout block of Google Images results for monkeys will take the entire top section of the search results. [The Official Google Search Blog]


Take Control Of Your Mac's Memory Usage

Mac OS X is a slick, powerful operating system, but there’s a cost to all that gloss. Most users don’t ever bother to check, but many of the apps they use every day are notorious RAM-gobblers, eating up huge amounts of system memory and making even brand new Macs feel like they’re running slowly. Here’s a look at why you should keep an eye on your Mac’s memory usage, how to monitor it, and which apps are the worst offenders when it comes to memory drain.


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FaceNiff Is The Firesheep For Android, Hijacks Facebook Sessions With One Tap

If you remember the privacy fiasco that Firesheep caused just months ago by allowing laptop-toting pranksters to hijack the Facebook accounts of unwitting public Wi-Fi users, then you’ll know the sort of tom-foolery that’s about to ensue now that FaceNiff exists. The app allows Android phones to sniff out and use Facebook accounts of other users on the same open wireless network with a single tap of the finger.


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10 Android Apps That Make Rooting Your Phone Worth The Hassle

Android phones are spectacular little devices because they’re able to do so much that others simply can’t, but one big snag in that greatness is that many of the best features require that the phones be rooted. With all the apps available in the Android Market, the most essential tend to be those that add these extra features. Whether you plan on installing custom ROMs or not, you may want to root your phone just to install those apps. Here are the 10 most essential apps available for Android that require root.


8 Great Experimental Features To Enable In Google Calendar's Labs

We’ve highlighted plenty of Labs features for Gmail, but Calendar has some pretty great Labs offerings, too. Since it’s been nearly two years since Labs were added to Calendar, we thought it was about time they got a bit more attention. Here are eight of the most useful experimental features available for Google Calendar that you can start using right now.


How To Encrypt All Internet Use On Your Android Phone

When you connect to a public Wi-Fi network, your Android phone is susceptible to the same sorts of attacks as a laptop — as demonstrated by the Android data vulnerability exposed a few days ago. The solution to securing your communication is simple: you have to encrypt it. Here’s how to set up an SSH tunnel as a cheap, easy method to encrypt all your Android phone’s data.


Stand Or Die! Tracks Your Time Spent In Front Of A Standing Desk

Following hot on the heels of the previously mentionedSitting is Killing You” infographic, the Stand or Die! standing clock is meant to get people spending more time out of their chairs, and tracking their hours spent upright.