France's Destruction Of A Migrant Camp Looks Like A Scene From They Live

France's Destruction of a Migrant Camp Looks Like a Scene From They Live

The French migrant camp near Calais, also known as The Jungle, is currently being torn down with the help of "several hundred" riot police, according to the Wall Street Journal. And sadly it looks like a scene from John Carpenter's 1988 horror-dystopia film They Live. "We have started removing empty shelters in the southern part of the camp," a spokesperson for the French police told the Wall Street Journal today. "That work will continue every day over the next few weeks."

We often use dystopian media to talk about the world we live in. And the migrant crisis in Europe and around the world looks increasingly like the dystopian fantasies of They Live and Children of Men.

France's Destruction of a Migrant Camp Looks Like a Scene From They Live

French police begin firing tear gas at migrants in the Calais camp (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

In They Live, a makeshift homeless encampment in Los Angeles is destroyed by police with bulldozers and riot police.

France's Destruction of a Migrant Camp Looks Like a Scene From They Live

Screenshot from the horror-dystopia film They Live (1988)

From the Wall Street Journal:

French authorities said last week that they planned to relocate 800-1,000 migrants living in the southern part of the Jungle, after a judge dismissed a last-ditch petition by humanitarian groups to delay the evacuation. French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve pledged to offer all migrants new housing, adding the government never intended to "bulldoze" the camp and "brutally evict" its inhabitants.

The government may never have intended to "bulldoze" the camp. But that's precisely what they're doing today.

The French government claims that there's more than enough temporary housing in the area, where an unspecified number of shipping containers have been made into makeshift homes. But humanitarian groups in France say there simply aren't enough.

France's Destruction of a Migrant Camp Looks Like a Scene From They Live

Screenshot from the horror-dystopia film They Live (1988)

From the Wall Street Journal:

Humanitarian groups, however, say that more than 3,000 migrants will be affected by the dismantlement, and the available lodgings in the area won't be enough to accommodate all of them.

Those who can't get housing in local shelters will be transferred to facilities in other parts of France, authorities say.

Police have also been using firehoses to disperse the migrants, a tactic that goes above and beyond any fictional dystopia we see in They Live.

The migrants have held signs saying "We Are Not Terrorists, so don't destroy our homes." The signs, of course, have not stopped the riot police.

Upheaval and mass frustration in the world is nothing new. But it's disheartening when the darkest visions of filmmakers can't compete with reality.

France's Destruction of a Migrant Camp Looks Like a Scene From They Live

Migrants and activists at the Calais camp (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

This ain't no Jetsons shit.

France's Destruction of a Migrant Camp Looks Like a Scene From They Live

French police taking position at the Calais camp (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Top image: Screenshot from the horror-dystopia film They Live (1988)


Comments

    They're being referred to as 'migrants', because they are not refugees who are legitimately seeking asylum from a war zone. This is because they circumvented the proper immigration construct and are currently living in a literal rubbish tip with the hope of storming the UK border for their own economic advantage.

    They were offered heated, secured accommodation but refused on the ground that registration was mandatory - negatively affecting their ability to jump further to the UK.

      100% agreed. Bleeding hearts needs to get back down to earth and realize what's actually happening.

      Last edited 01/03/16 3:18 pm

      No, migrants is the term used when asylum claims can not be verified and confirmed. Considering the now five year upwards wait to become settled after signing up with the UN, and the importance money plays in actually, you know, living in today's society, it's no wonder a range of people are gravitating to large economies and not wanting to languish in the edge of the EU for years in physical and economic limbo.

      Hell, being an economic migrant does not mean you are the stereotype envisaged by you or a lesser type of migrant. Dying by poverty is little different from dying by bomb; it's just that one is slightly more acceptable to feel bad for (though both elicit surprisingly little emotion or action from apparently human beings in established economies like ours).

      Most of the economic issues faced by migrants (fleeing war or chasing way better educational and economic situations for themselves and their families) have their roots in the global environment. Many places, like the UK and EU as a whole, have become economic powerhouses largely off the back of exploitation both of natural resources and populations.

      It's a myopic view to see the issues as one of 'the others' making, and an ignorant one to ignore so much easily accessible history of ones own country. Quite frankly, you need to get over this notion of an orderly queue and ask yourself why people might not want to follow rules which are ostensibly about keeping a vast number of people locked in underperforming economies whilst the like or Europe still benefit from these economies producing resources and cheap labour for their own wealth.

    Funny how, when it was Australia not rolling out the red carpet for illegal immigrants, all of europe was up in arms. When the shoe is on the other foot....

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