You Can Now Torrent Brand New TV Shows In 4K

We've been complaining about the dearth of good quality 4K video — movies and TV shows, things we'd actually like to watch — for years now, ever since Ultra HD TVs started hitting the shelves of our favourite electronics stores. In Australia, having our relatively crappy internet speeds, streaming 4K over Netflix has never really been viable. Ultra HD Blu-ray looks great, though it's been a year away for five years now.

But good news for pirates over the weekend — a torrent release group has cracked the encryption on Netflix and Amazon's 4K video lockers, and ultra high-def rips of brand new TV shows are flooding out across the 'net.

Pirate image via Shutterstock

As Torrentfreak reports, TrollUHD releases of shows like Marvel's Jessica Jones (nee Netflix) and The Man In The High Castle (nee Amazon), as well as movies like Looper, have been appearing on torrent sites for just under a week. The file sizes of these individual episodes are predictably massive — The Man In The High Castle, an Amazon release set in an alternate-history 1962 where Nazi Germany won World War II, clocks in at around 10GB per 60-minute episode, while Jessica Jones, a Marvel comic series based on the Alias graphic novels and released on Netflix, tips the scales at around 15GB per 60-minute screening.

It appears the issue exploited by the new release group relies on a hole within the HDCP audiovisual security layer, rather than an issue specific to either Netflix or Amazon. Says Torrentfreak: "The new 4K leaks come from both Netflix and Amazon, suggesting that there’s a general loophole that allows pirates to circumvent the copy protection on both services."

Interestingly, despite being extremely high quality — with 4K video running at 32.5Mbps for 24fps footage, versus the circa 4 to 6Mbps that most 720p or 1080p TV rips are encoded at — the Ultra HD rips are drawing some complaints, with downloaders saying that Jessica Jones in particular looks disappointing, "because the master from Netflix is probably bad", a release group insider told Torrentfreak.

It could be that a new streaming device released onto the market with inferior security is to blame for the rips making their way online; Roku's new 4K-compatible Roku 4 hit store shelves in early November, while the Amazon Fire TV is equally new and only supports the outdated HDCP1.4b protocol. [Torrentfreak]

Questions, comments, tips? You can find me on Twitter at @csimps0n.


Comments

    You're gonna need unlimited downloads and bloody big pipes to download 4k, even for legal stuff. This current batch won't be there for long either, no doubt the providers will crack down hard on this.

      *This* is what 6TB and 8TB hard drives were made for.

        I'm nervous about losing that much data, after almost losing all the data on a 1.5TB drive this year :P

          Simple solution: Get two drives and mirror them ;-)

            True :P I mean if i'm spending that much on a single drive, may as well get 2 and do exactly that.

            Do you really need to mirror a drive of pirated crap? If you lose it, meh, you never owned it anyway. How many times are you going to watch Season 02 Episode 3 of House of Cards?

          Just download it again ... not like it is your own home movies and irreplaceable :-)

          Oh you mean losing "your" stuff ?
          Just buy multiple smaller drives and RAID them up, that'll give you a level of redundancy, and on top of that backup to one of those online storage providers for a few $ a month.

        Um you actually just said that, a man who works for fairfax media ... part owner of stan ... wow, just wow :-)

          Do Stan even do 1080p? Not their loss :p

    I personally don't see the appeal of torrenting 4K at this point in time, or even streaming it.

    Our internet speeds are so bad here, it's just a waste of bandwidth that slows everyone else down.

    Hopefully our infrastructure can catch up to our content at some point, as I find myself watching random crap on 9HD just because it's HD, so I'm sure 4K is spectacular!

    With that size, I think I need one these storage servers for home use.
    http://www.45drives.com/products/storage/q30.php

    Serves the Copyright-Cult right. I discovered recently that I can't watch 4K Netflix on my UHD monitor because "PCs and Macs have screen capture apps". So... I have the hardware I need to run a 4K stream, my internet is ~35Mbits down and is therefore fast enough, but I can't watch 4K legally unless I buy a UHD TV because some sh*theads in Hollywood think I'll use my PC to illegally copy it afterwards? F*ck off. I'm trying to play by your rules and you still keep throwing sh*t in my face.

    This is precisely why file sharing exists. They make legitimate customers jump through these idiotic and frustrating hoops, whereas people who torrent just get the f*cking content they want with no strings attached.

    In any case, downloading that amount of data for entertainment purposes just isn't really practical at the moment, at least in Australia, particularly when you can get exactly the same content either legally on Blu-ray or iTunes (or just regular HD Netflix), or illegally from a different torrent and it's about 1/10th the size. 4K just isn't enough of a leap up in image quality to justify the huge filesizes you'd need to stream or store.

      This is precisely why file sharing exists. They make legitimate customers jump through these idiotic and frustrating hoops, whereas people who torrent just get the f*cking content they want with no strings attached.

      This is why even if I had the NBN I'd still buy the physical media. Sure, there are still those anti-piracy ads and trailers before the main menu but at least I don't have to submit a DNA sample every time I reopen iTunes just to prove I am the one who purchased the content.

      Seriously even if either side starts laying down gigabit Internet (idealistic I know, but just follow me for a sec), no one will stream because the DRM in it will put them right off and will still ask for the physical media.

      Poor Internet (even here) is not a major contributor. It's the DRM.

      Last edited 30/11/15 11:41 am

        not main will stream because
        Not quite understanding this...

        I'm fairly certain FTTH is actually capable of 1000mbps down, it's hard to find on the NBNco site, but they do list prices for 1000/400.

        no one will stream because the DRM in it will put them right off and will still ask for the physical media.
        I would say the demise of video stores, the 10% decline in physical media sales^, and the rise of streaming services like Netflix show that not everyone is as passionate about DRM and ownership as you might think.
        In fact, the rise of Stan and local ISPs mirroring Netflix shows how popular streaming is.

        People are streaming today, on their DSL connections. They sill stream tomorrow on their DSL connections, and they will stream when the NBN is completed.

        ^http://www.techguide.com.au/news/bddvd-news/digital-downloads-make-up-for-decline-in-dvd-and-blu-ray-disc-sales/

          The decline of video stores is different to the decline in sales though, because at a video store you are only renting so there is no ownership. Given the choice between the more convenient method of "rental" via streaming vs driving to the shop to rent the physical media its no surprise that people are opting for the streaming method. Whereas with regards to actual ownership, people do still like to have something physical in their hand.

            Years ago you used to be able to buy DVDs and CDs in Myer, David Jones, BigW, JB, Supermarkets and dedicated Video retailers like EzyDVD and Video Rental stores (renting and selling new and ex-rentals). Now the department stores have mostly gotten rid of them, and retailers whose sole business is renting and selling movies are pretty much extinct.
            Now renting physical media is pretty much the domain of libraries and the odd vending machine.

      I can't watch 4K legally unless I buy a UHD TV because some sh*theads in Hollywood think I'll use my PC to illegally copy it afterwards?

      Those paranoid bastards!

      a torrent release group has cracked the encryption on Netflix and Amazon’s 4K video lockers, and ultra high-def rips of brand new TV shows are flooding out across the ‘net.

      Oh...

      I get it though - it's a vicious cycle. People keep cracking copyright protection so companies keep trying to make it more secure. As the pirates and content creators battle it out the average consumer gets stuck in the middle.

      I have a UHD TV, but it has the old Netflix app that doesn't do 4k, so I'd have to buy a 4k capable set top box that has the new 4k Netflix app...

        Owch! Talk about a rip off.

        What's the point of a TV having a 4K panel if you can't send 4K content to it?

        Out of curiosity what inputs does it support? If it's less than HDMI 1.4 then you really have been shafted as (from what I can recall) that is the minimum version for supporting 4K content.

          HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2. Just the actual appstore is that awful Opera TV store before Sony changed it. Plus side is my panel had a better response time than the one that replaced it.

            HDMI 2.0: New license to print money.

            HDCP 2.2: Another reason why studio can't blame piracy.

    Netflix 4K is great. Not UHD BD, of course, but still worlds better than FHD.

    Netflix deserves our money. Their business model is basically what us as Aussies are saying is the solution to mass piracy. Ergo, don't pirate Netflix stuff please.

      Alternately, only pirate it if you have a subscription and want to be able to watch the stuff that you're legally entitled to, but physically can't, thanks to shitty connections and the inherent limitations of streaming.

        How many people with shitty connections are paying extra for 4k Netflix.

          I'm not sure if I'm paying for 4K but I'm definitely paying for HD and it's not just for the HD but for the additional devices. My memory's hazy, but I believe paying for 4K also grants the option for playing on even more devices?

            I'm not sure, I'm grandfathered on the old US HD plan which is a couple of dollars less and multiple devices anyway. I'll never see NBN, the cable has been hanging in my basement for two years now, so no point in paying more.

            yeah, when you pay for 4 devices it opens up 4K as well (when available). 2 Devices just gives you "HD", although Im not exactly sure what res that is.

      Exactly. I'm still running ADSL, I've had an Amazon Prime sub for a couple of years. It's great, their customer service is second to none, and I've only had minor buffering issues since the NBN put the box outside my house (it's faffed up my home phone as well). Hopefully this will solve itself once I connect.

    would be interesting to see these reencoded using x265. Might get those file sizes down to more manageable sizes.

    Maybe it's just me, but promoting torrenting doesn't seem right.

    Last edited 30/11/15 1:45 pm

      Do you mean this article? I certainly don't think it's promoting torrenting.

        You're saying Netflix has a flaw and where to get its content from, so yeah it's kind of promotes torrenting.

        But I guess one could assume if this flaw was discovered, it's shows would've been torrented anyway, so nevermind...

        Last edited 30/11/15 6:39 pm

          Seriously, it's a tech site, this is tech news. He's not saying where to get it, he's not saying how to get it, just that someone found the flaw. Are you promoting censorship of news media as a protectionist measure ensuring the profits of entertainment media?

    Some of these sizes are pretty nuts.

    https://torrentfreak.com/pirates-can-now-rip-4k-content-from-netflix-and-amazon-151127/

    Any chance some of these 4K rips will make it to Kodi?

    Not if you use the new x265 codec, 4K rips in that codec for these 60min shows are around the 1.5GB mark and look amazing.

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