Mind-Control Breakthrough: Quadriplegic Woman Flies F-35 With Her Mind

Mind-control breakthrough: Quadriplegic woman flies F-35 with her mind

Arati Prabhakar — director of the Pentagons advanced research arm DARPA — has revealed a breakthrough achievement in machine mind control: Jan Scheuermann, a 55-year-old quadriplegic woman with electrodes implanted in her brain, has been able to fly an F-35 fighter jet using just her mind. This is her:

Mind-control breakthrough: Quadriplegic woman flies F-35 with her mind

Scheuermann — who is quadriplegic because of an hereditary genetic disease — was recruited by DARPA for its robotics programs. Scientists and doctors implanted electrodes in the left motor cortex of her brain in 2012 to allow her to control a robotic arm, which she did successfully. But she's not using the robotic arms to control the joystick in the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II simulator used for the tests. She is controlling the plane with "nothing but her thoughts," according to Prabhakar, pure neural signaling:

Instead of thinking about controlling a joystick, which is what our ace pilots do when they're driving this thing, Jan's thinking about controlling the aeroplane directly. For someone who's never flown — she's not a pilot in real life — she's flying that simulator directly from her neural signaling.

Mind-control breakthrough: Quadriplegic woman flies F-35 with her mind

The F-35 simulator in action

Prabhakar, who made the announcement at the first Future of War conference, celebrated last week in Washington, expressed some concern about the future applications of this technology, which was initially created to enable soldiers and people affected by motor problems, extending their bodies using robotic parts:

In doing this work, we've also opened this door. We can now see a future where we can free the brain from the limitations of the human body and I think we can all imagine amazing good things and amazing potential bad things that are on the other side of that door.

I can't see the "bad potential" of this overweighting the good potential. Sure, we can use machine mind control to remotely control killing robot soldiers on the field, but we can already do that just like we control drones.

What I can see on this is one more step closer to enable people with motor problems to overcome whatever limitations they have. If DARPA has really achieved what Prabhakar is talking about, this is an amazing breakthrough for the seamless integration of robotics and humans — and a giant leap towards the singularity.


Comments

    I'm curious how well she can fly. Would mind-control make pilots better by giving them more "natural" direct control or would the latency be a problem? I'm really curious because even if it's not that great in comparison to a real joystick, surely the two systems could be used in conjunction, using your brain to control auxiliary systems that you normally would have to use your hands to control.

    This may explain some of the F-35 cost blowouts?

    Love the Firefox movie GIF. Soooo many people would not get that reference.

    At least there's no risk of a stray thought causing her F-35 to accidentally shoot down a passing by passenger jet.

    Although it does mention it once in the body of the article, the title is misleading. She did not fly an "F-35 fighter jet using just her mind". She controlled a simulator. The truth is somewhat less impressive, even if it is still quite an achievement.

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