This Is What HDR Photography Should Look Like

This is what HDR photography should look like

Daniel Cheong says he is a digital blending freak, a post-production photography technique "that manually blends multiple bracketed exposures in order to obtain the maximum dynamic range" without getting the tiring, everything is illuminated effect of overcooked HDR. And he succeeds.

That storm against the Milky Way photo above is a great example of his work. These too:

This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like
This is what HDR photography should look like

Daniel Cheong works in the telecom industry but his passion is photography, which he fully embraced when he bought his first DSLR in Singapore back in 2006. He aims "to perfect the technique of Digital Blending, which consists of manually blending multiple bracketed exposures in order to obtain the maximum dynamic range, while trying to keep a very natural look and avoiding the common mistake of many 'overcooked' HDR images. This slight element of the surreal, or hyper reality often found in painting is what I am trying to achieve."

You can follow him on his site, Flickr, Twitter, 500px, and Facebook.

This is part of a series in which we are featuring futuristic and striking photography.


Comments

    Jaysus, those are nice.
    They look like super high-end computer renders, i.e. it is immediately obvious they are not 'in camera' but the sytlising is quite beautiful in some of those.

    Those are fantastic. Generally I *hate* HDR, but these have made me change my mind. Now I just hate it when people half ass it!

      You don't hate HDR. You hate shitty tone mapping pumped out by dummies with Photomatix.

    Love the Dubai metro stations. Even in real life they look like something from the future.

    These are just great. I'm going to Dubai next week and I'm looking forward to the architecture just from seeing these...

    Great shots, love the architecture ones in particular.

    If you use Canon, the HDR processing is required. If you use Sony or Nikon (is a Sony sensor), then HDR processing is not necessary because the sensor has a great dynamic range. Most of the picture above is achievable with Sony A7 series without having to take 3 brackets. This is only news to Canon users.

      Uh, the shots were taken on a Nikon D810. One of the highest dynamic range sensors on the market. But that doesn't mean you're able to take a photo of the Milky Way and of clouds and a storm and the sea all in a single snap :)

        Actually, you are, you just aren't able to see it all on a computer monitor, because of gamut issues, so you need to remap the image to makes sense of it all when you look at it on a monitor. What this guy has effectively done is simply to apply different corrections to different parts of the image to bring out all the detail.

        It ain't rocket science and I can point you to a very powerful, now free, product from Autodesk that could do it all for you if you are a) interested, and b) can be bothered mounting what is a VERY steep learning curve.

          I know a bit about tone mapping adjustments and masking, I do them quite a bit on my landscape photography. But there ain't no sensor out there that can capture the brightness of a lightning strike and the near-pitch-blackness of the night sky in a single exposure. You've gotta take at least a few and blend them.

            OK, if you're talking about digital cameras, then sure, but they aren't the only kinds of cameras out there. I only deal with the EXR and HDR image files, I have cameramen to worry about the hardware side of things.

              Oh, OK, totally get you. That kinda stuff is very much out of my wheel house :) What is it you do?

      PGR, you are an idiot and sound like every spergy Nikon fanboy out there who is repeating some uninformed junk they read on a petapixel comments thread.

      A d800 has (theoretically, according to dxo) two more stops than a 5D3. At base ISO. Therefore, every other camera is useless and has never been able to photograph anything - including the Nikon D4, which only has 13 stops.

      Or, in the real world (ie, outside of posting 100% corner crops of test charts to Fred Miranda), there is practically zero difference in all but the most contrived situations.

      Clownshoe.

      Last edited 26/02/15 1:11 pm

    Sensational work...reclaiming HDR from the joke it has become. Beautiful PP.

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