Netflix Really Is Destined For Australia, Says Village Roadshow CEO

One day Netflix has plans for Australia, the next... not so much. While there are ways of accessing the US-based streaming service locally, it would be a heck of a lot better if you could just watch it, sans the run-around. Now we have the strongest indication yet that Netflix is on its way to Australia, with Village Roadshow all but confirming its arrival.

Just one small point — we don't have any sort of date. Speaking with ZDNet's Josh Taylor, Village Roadshow's co-CEO Graham Burke was more than happy to acknowledge Netflix's looming entry into the country, but stopped short of providing hard details on its launch:

"[On] Netflix, they're talking to our people about supply of products, so they are opening and coming to Australia," he said.

Also: Village Roadshow CEO: iiNet Is Lying About Piracy

According to the ZDNet piece, organising content deals has been the primary barrier preventing the streaming platform's debut.

Graham also took the opportunity to take another shot at iiNet — specifically regarding the delay of The Lego Movie in Australia. From the interview:

"The Lego Movie, with iiNet along with all the lies they tell, and they know they're telling lies, a lot of good decent people out there have a bunch of assumptions they believe to be correct [because of iiNet]. They know that Lego was a rare exception. The reason Lego was delayed because it was an Australian film," he said.

"We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it. That was a one off. It's not an example of how films are delayed in Australia."

More: iiNet's Steve Dalby To Village Roadshow: 'It's Not Our Job To Stop Online Infringers'

Not sure how long we'll be hearing barbs exchanged between the two companies, but it sure keeps things interesting.

[ZDNet]

Next Read: Why Excuses For High Australian Movie Ticket Prices Don't Cut It


Comments

    It'll be a waste of time... First, it costs around nine bucks for the US version, it'll be two or three times that here... Second, The content will be crippled worse than a two legged dog... :(

    Last edited 29/06/14 12:11 pm

      True but it will most likely have content that won't be available on Netflix US or UK. There will be more content and all you have to do is just switch regions on Hola unblocker.

        but it will most likely have content that won't be available on Netflix US or UKLike what, Neighbors..? :)
        Plus Unblocker won't do anything for an AU based Netflix either, you'd have to pay for the US version too..!

        Last edited 29/06/14 1:20 pm

          Unless they've changed all you have to do is switch Hola from US to UK to start watching Netflix UK on the same account.

            I'll believe that when I see it... actually I'll believe it if someone else sees it, cos at the price I'm sure they will be charging, compared to US, I'll be sticking with the US version, and giving the local one, if it ever appears, a miss... :)

              That's what I've been saying. Keep the US account and if there's content in Netflix AU you want to watch just switch Hola from US to AU or turn it off to get access to Netflix AU.

                Plus those of us with existing Netflix accounts have two years sheltered from price rises :D

              Incorrect, Timmahh (why on earth do you use an ellipsis at the end of every sentence?). Netflix accounts appear to be persistent between timezones. I can change my getflix region between US, UK and other countries and access the netflix libraries from there. All you'd need to do to access the Australian one is to disable hola/getflix/unblockme and your account will automatically show you the AU selection.

    if it comes in at 19.95 p/m i can guarantee it would have about 2 mill aussie subs within a year

      Why should we pay double what they do in the US for the same or less content?

    The reason Lego was delayed because it was an Australian film
    It's funny how Australia was the last country in the world to watch an Australian film.

      They know that Lego was a rare exception. The reason Lego was delayed because it was an Australian film

      This is an idiotic attempt by Graham Burke to retroactively justify his actions and makes no sense at all. It sounds like he thinks that a movie being made in Australia inherently means that it's going to have a later release, as if it were self evident... what?

      We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it.

      Kids don't see an ad for a movie, and then ask their parents if they can wait until school holidays to see it. Village Roadshow think they can make more money by delaying release until school holidays, but the reality is that NOBODY CARES WHY a movie is late, it just makes people annoyed, and is a big reason why they torrent.

      We made the decision

      Your decisions cause piracy.

      Last edited 30/06/14 9:37 am

    My god, Burke is an insufferable prat, isn't he? He just flat out says that iiNet are liars, even though everything they've said is backed up by the evidence. You want to stop piracy? Stop being dicks and start offering content cheaply and in a timely fashion. How many times does it have to be said before these greedy f*cks get it into their skulls? Newsflash geniuses: the Internet genie is out of the bottle and no amount of lobbying and lawmaking is going to force it back in. Either adapt to the new digital world or die. It's that simple.

    "We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it."

    Yeah... In other words, you deliberately held back the film in the hopes that it would maximise your profits, and then bitched about it when people pirated it instead of waiting. Welcome to the 21st Century dipsh*t.

      I wish Graham Burke or one of his minions gets to read this. Dinosaurs need to know... the asteroids are coming and your old ways are heading for a hell of an ice age.

      Adapt or die. Simple brilliant.

      Is Village Road Show a publicly listed company on the ASX? maybe it's time share holders booted this bozo out. Like that idiot that Sol that ran Telstra into the ground thinking they could take on Google.

        Yes, it's publicly listed. But through some shady rigging, the majority of voting shares are held by Burke and the Kirbys. It's an absolute joke of a company where these three clowns have continuously screwed over minority holders in the name of self enrichment.

        Rest assured, if Netflix does come to AU via these dummies, it's going to be crippled and hilariously priced.

        Last edited 30/06/14 11:17 am

      How many times does it have to be said before these greedy f*cks get it into their skulls?

      They already know this. Its greed that drives people like this to try and circumvent things regardless of if its right, wrong or makes any sense.
      Logic does not apply. The only end result that matters is if their bottom line expands like a balloon at any cost.

      I want to shout everything you just wrote into Graham Burke's face

      The hide of them , making a commercial decision to maximise profits. imagine other companies did that.

        Or rather, not so much the hide of them as, "Haha, look at those guys charging triple the price in a different region at absolutely not extra logistics cost being surprised that in this global village, the over-charged region can see they're getting a worse deal and aren't signing up for it because they have illegal options which are completely and utterly without negative consequence."

        That might be a more realistic way of looking at things.

          You are kidding yourself if you think there is no extra logistics costs in running this in Australia.

          Cost of hosting servers will be much higher here , as will marketing costs , every staff member in the AU company would be on a lot higher than their US counterparts , rents are higher , everything to provide the service is higher.

    Pretty sure that village roadshow and the other big companies have been talking with Netflix about AU for a while now, and are pretty much the reason why it's not already available here.

    No doubt they're trying to hamstring the streaming service with their outdated business models.

      x2 on this, Netflix aren't stupid. Until they can get favourable content deals allowing them to underprice the market with more content, they aren't coming to Australia.

        They don't need to come to Australia. They just need to accept Australian addresses in our accounts. They should be bypassing the geo blocking and leave the pricing the same as the US.

          Unfortunately their deals with US distributors wont allow that.

            Correct. Content distributors want to maximise their dollar value in every country. They won't stand for this back dooring for much longer, which is why Village is in the picture. They have major contracts for distribution with all the Hollywood movie houses. They'll lean on them to keep Netflix as gimped as possible here.

          They do accept Australian addresses. 90210 is the postcode for Australia right? I mean it must be, it couldn't possibly be a suburb in the USA not with it's 23 million residents ;)

            123 fake st 90210 must have a lot of Netflix customers :p

            But seriously, Cali have state sales tax, the smart ones are registered in states like Oregon :p

              True true, although I doubt that most people are aware of that.

              I really wish someone would release some statistics for it. I know they never would short of a leak since it would be straight out admitting they don't care what address people put in but damn I'm curious as too the actual numbers ^_^

              I'll bet the White House has a lot of Netflix subscriptions as well.

      i just dont get why they cant just not geo block australian users
      or is it because the license holders in australia have parent companies in the US?

        Because it would breach their agreements with their US distributors.

    “We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it."

    Love the pseudo-customer-centricity here.

    HA! I'm sure if you asked kids if they would rather watch an awesome new lego movie now or in a few months they would most likely say now. They really have no logic at all

    So this prick wants us to believe they held back the Lego movie for the benefit of the fans? Pigs arse. What fucking bullshit. Now we know what you are, we're just haggling on the price.

    Can we flag any future stories with this guy and label the headline, "This greedy cunt says"........

    Last edited 29/06/14 10:18 pm

      Someone needs to adapt that Tony Abbott extension for Chrome.

    I will only believe that Netflix is coming to Australia when Netflix announces it themselves. Even then I won't believe it until I can sign up for a subscription

      Just get a yank one, then if they come to Aus, you can region switch easily while paying less if there is anything worth watching in the AU catalogue :p

    We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it. That was a one off. It’s not an example of how films are delayed in Australia.

    Because whenever you offer a child anything they just say "I'll wait for the holidays, thanks".

      How bout they delay the worldwide launch till our holidays then perhaps?
      The rest of the world didn't need to see it any earlier as they wouldn't have been on holidays afaik.
      Bunch of asshats that think they are fighting to protect their work but are just making it artificially unavailable to people who want it so they go elsewhere.

    They know that Lego was a rare exception.

    Bullshit. This happens all the time. Especially kids movies. They are released on Thanksgiving in the US and not released in Australia until boxing day.

    Examples of delayed Australian releases:
    Frozen - 19 November 2013 in US. 26 December 2013 in Australia.
    Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 - 27 September 2013 in US, 28 November 2013 in Australia.
    The Wolf Of Wall Street - 17 December 2013 in US. 23 January 2014 in Australia.

    To say that Australian delays are "rare" is clearly untrue.

    It sounds like they are in price negotiation with Netflix and announcing that fact is a way for them to apply pressure to those price negotiations. In essence their getting Aussie's hopes up by saying this, so if negotiations don't end up coming to fruition they can point the finger at Netflix, creating "bad press" for them.

    Hopefully they realize that Australians want the service provided at the price it's provided at, not the brand name. Some grotesque parody of Netflix bearing the same name is not going to go down well.

    And of course, "What, we gave you fucking Netflix! You people are impossible to please!" is going to be the predictable cry when no-one takes up the service if it provides half the range at double the price of the US version.

    I really, really, really hope it doesn't pan out that way.

    ohhh... Village Roadshow is involved and not the content creators... well i guess that means $60+ a month and no content for Australians.

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