Watch How An iPad Was Used To Paint This Hologram

This is, without a doubt, the most magical thing I've seen the iPad do yet: a video of gorgeous, twinkling holograms, captured in stop motion as an iPad was pulled through the air. Confused? Just watch.

The video is a collaboration between Dentsu London and BERG, the latter of which is responsible for awesome projects such as BBC Dimensions and the Mag+ tablet concept.

About this feat, they explain:

First we create software models of three-dimensional typography, objects and animations. We render cross sections of these models, like a virtual CAT scan, making a series of outlines of slices of each form. We play these back on the surface of the iPad as movies, and drag the iPad through the air to extrude shapes captured in long exposure photographs. Each 3D form is itself a single frame of a 3D animation, so each long exposure still is only a single image in a composite stop frame animation.

When the individual words are writhing across the screen there's barely a trace of the iPad that made them. But my favourites are the final shots, where all three words appear together and you can see the ghostly forms of the people creating them. Kinda spooky, very beautiful. [BERG and Dentsu London]


Comments

    wow, and it could ONLY be done with an ipad... because it's the only 9 inch lcd in the WORLD!

      Maybe I'm missing something, but where in either the video or the article is it said that this is only possibly on an iPad?

        I'm not entirely sure how the app works, but I would think they went with the iPad because of the inbuilt accelerometers. Moving it would cause the image to change to the next image, meaning you could move as fast or as slow as you liked but still retain the final product. That's my idea anyway, love the end product.

    And yet, you can't watch the video on one...

      actually most vimeo vids work on it aye

    That seems like a huge waste of time instead of just using your PC or Mac & photoshop or whatever your preference software is.

    What has not been mentioned is the dark conditions the DSLR requires for long term exposures. One may have to work in near darkness so an exposure would not get spoiled by too much light or from small light sources. However, a novel idea.

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